Telenor traffic booths draw mixed reaction

MyanmarThe Norwegian telco has inked an agreement to spruce up traffic huts in Yangon and Mandalay, outfitting the booths with a Telenor logo and an LED screen displaying a set of traffic rules in Myanmar language. Telenor Myanmar CEO Petter Furberg said it has not paid any money to the authorities. “The only cost Telenor has is painting and fixing the booths, as some were in a pretty bad state,” he told The Myanmar Times last month.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13563-telenor-traffic-booths-draw-mixed-reaction.html

Yangon University waffles on WiFi

Myanmar“We haven’t reached an agreement with Yangon University to provide the service, because the university hasn’t replied to us,” he said. “But if Yangon gives us an agreement, we will give free WiFi service inside the university.” Yangon University rector U Aung Thu said the university currently provides sufficient connectivity for students, though will take up Redlink’s offer it finds it needs help.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13519-yangon-university-waffles-on-wifi.html

Millions more mobile subscribers added, from Myanmar

MyanmarSIM cards on every corner – and at prices people can afford, instead of the thousands of dollars they once cost – have opened up mobile services to record percentages of the population. The country’s number of mobile users grew by millions since 2013, driven by the availability of SIM cards and affordability of service, said Ovum research analyst Vivek Roy in a press release. At the end of 2014, mobile subscribers had reached 14.8 million in Myanmar, the release said.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13502-millions-more-mobile-subscribers-added.html

Ooredoo results show 2.2 million subs at end 2014

MyanmarOoredoo also said that eight out of every 10 of its Myanmar users currently access the network through smartphones – making for healthy returns from its average customer, according to the press release. The Qatar-based telco claimed 2.2 million users in Myanmar at the end of December 2014. Its rival Telenor claimed 3.4 million subscribers in Myanmar at the same date at the end of last year.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13484-ooredoo-results-show-2-2-million-subs-at-end-2014.html

E-commerce slowly escalates, from Myanmar

MyanmarCompanies are crowding in to online shopping in a bid to be Myanmar’s version of Amazon or Alibaba. With all the competition, though, it is increasingly difficult to stand out in an industry that is only now finding its feet. Zaw Gyi Mart has been around for two years, but counts only 10,000 total users since its inception, said U Zaw Min Aung, managing director of parent company Za Information Technology.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13491-e-commerce-slowly-escalates.html

Telenor’s Net Monday marks one year at People’s Park

MyanmarThe company’s Net Monday events started last year before the Telenor network had even launched. Since then, the series has reached 10,000 students from five universities and travelled to four cities, according to Telenor Myanmar CEO Petter Furberg. Conditions have changed quite a bit for Telenor since it held its first Net Monday last year. Since its first event, the Norway-based telco has scaled up service sites to number 1622 in Myanmar – putting its network at just over 20pc complete, by its own metric.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13492-telenor-s-net-monday-marks-one-year-at-people-s-park.html

AppExpo 2015 sees thousands attend in third year running

MyanmarThe event, aimed at an industry audience, saw steady levels of attendees over last year, according to Yangon Heartz Media CEO U Zaw Zaw Myo Lwin. The expo puts a wide range of tech community members in one place, gathering the likes of software houses, developers, and software importers and connecting them with startup freelance developers and more, AppExpo’s website said. Exhibitors ranged from Samsung to local startup, Nex, according to its website.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13307-appexpo-2015-sees-thousands-attend-in-third-year-running.html

Local iPhone sales given okay from Apple, from Myanmar

MyanmarAuthorised resellers are required to receive extensive approval from the American tech firm in everything from store location and design to stock they carry before receiving approval. The high standards can push a shop to become better, but require significant investments of time and money. Apple has four authorised resellers in Myanmar: Futureworld, mDrive, The Analytics Company (TAC) and Wai Yan Electronics. All have the go-ahead to start selling iPhones, but their launches have so far been different.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13304-local-iphone-sales-given-okay-from-apple.html

Telcos extend services beyond cities, from Myanmar

MyanmarK1500 SIM cards, quality phone connections and zippy internet are now close to the norm for urban dwellers. But while Yangonites, Mandalarians and residents of Nay Pyi Taw have had the choice of Telenor, Ooredoo and MPT for six months, that is far from the case elsewhere in the country. Myanmar’s telecoms race is in full swing. Tower companies are rapidly putting steel in the ground further and further from the largest cities, while fibre and microwave links are connected, generators fired up and equipment switched on.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13302-telcos-extend-services-beyond-cities.html

Gmail arrives in local language, from Myanmar

MyanmarThe move to extend Myanmar language support to Gmail, Google’s email service, brings the firm closer to its goal of making language a non-issue on the internet, and is one of a number of company initiatives aimed at encouraging the exchange of information into and out of Myanmar. The American search titan will also put on a local translation marathon February 28 under a new project surrounding Google Translate: “Love your Language”.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13256-google-email-arrives-in-local-language.html

MYTHIC submarine set to compete, from Maynmar

MyanmarCampana Group, based in Singapore with a Yangon subsidiary, will deliver international connectivity, a reliable submarine network and massive capacity at an economical price, U Myo Myint Ohn said. The firm’s MYTHIC cable project joins others currently in the works and aims to disrupt the effective monopoly state-owned incumbent Myanma Posts and Telecommunications (MPT) enjoys in doling out international capacity. The telco, as part of a consortium, currently runs the SEA-ME-WE 3 cable, which connects Myanmar to 33 other countries around the world. Soon, MPT will operate SEA-ME-WE 5, which will link up with 17 other countries.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13220-mythic-set-to-compete.html

Myanmar language, culture gets game users

MyanmarTotal Gameplay Studio’s Pawthoot Android app, named for lovable rascal and Myanmar cartoon cultural icon Thamain Pawthoot, has gained 40,000 users. An iOS version is in development. “We are expanding this game in the Myanmar market, and we will expand this game in the world,” said U Myint Kyaw Thu, Total Gameplay Studio chief technology officer.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13221-myanmar-language-culture-gets-game-users.html

Myanmar’s internet: ‘partly free’

MyanmarThis past December, watchdog organisation Freedom House bumped Myanmar’s “Freedom on the Net” ranking up from “not free” to “partly free”, highlighting heightened mobile access and legislative reform as key developments. Currently, only a few policies stand in place to regulate online behaviour in the country. This lack helps make Myanmar’s internet one of the Southeast Asian region’s freest, but could also leave users’ privacy unprotected. Meanwhile, legacy legislation could punish people for what they post, according to Mr Arnaudo.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13181-myanmar-s-internet-partly-free.html

Ecommerce services for payment to start

MyanmarWhile services like US-based PayPal and China’s AliPay are making it easy for seamless e-commerce around the world, Myanmar is still a cash-based society, with few of the solutions that has helped drive online shopping in the rest of the world. The Myanmar Payments Union, an enterprise owned by the domestic banks, is planning to launch a service allowing for online payments. It is already working with Cooperative, Myawaddy and United Amara, and is actively attempting to recruit more banks to take part in the service, said MPU chief executive U Zaw Lin Htut.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13075-ecommerce-services-for-payment-to-start.html

Startup meets showbiz on reality TV program

MyanmarLast year, restaurant management platform provider Code2LAB won a Yangon start-up bootcamp put on by Lithan University College, earning Ko Min Zeya Phyo US$2000 and a spot on Channel NewsAsia’s second season of Start-UP, a Singapore-based reality television show which aired its first episode last week. The entrepreneur has survived the cut to eight finalists, and is in the midst of filming episodes that see Code2LAB and fellow ventures face challenges and try to crowd-fund their start-ups.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13076-startup-meets-showbiz-on-reality-tv-program.html

Ecommerce services for payment to start

MyanmarWhile services like US-based PayPal and China’s AliPay are making it easy for seamless e-commerce around the world, Myanmar is still a cash-based society, with few of the solutions that has helped drive online shopping in the rest of the world. The Myanmar Payments Union, an enterprise owned by the domestic banks, is planning to launch a service allowing for online payments. It is already working with Cooperative, Myawaddy and United Amara, and is actively attempting to recruit more banks to take part in the service, said MPU chief executive U Zaw Lin Htut.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13075-ecommerce-services-for-payment-to-start.html

The future is still far off, from Mayanmar

MyanmarThere are banks in Myanmar that have already tackled mobile banking, which caters to customers with bank accounts. But across financial institutions, it’s still early days for mobile money services. On the uphill slog towards solutions – and in the end, financial inclusion for Myanmar’s rural unbanked – the government, banks and other industry players will be forced to confront a swath of issues around infrastructure, financial literacy, interoperability and more.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13003-the-future-is-still-far-off.html

Telenor expands beyond big cities, from Myanmar

MyanmarThe regional launches, announced January 22, add to Telenor’s network coverage as the telco makes its way to covering half of Myanmar’s townships by this month’s end. Telenor’s moves mark the first time the telco has deployed its services outside Myanmar’s three largest cities – Yangon, Mandalay and Nay Pyi Taw. To slake demand, the firm has begun issuing 1.5 million new SIM cards into the market monthly, a release said.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/13004-telenor-expands-beyond-big-cities.html

Mobile could kill cafes

MyanmarBut they will remain important to internet gamers, according to a prominent local games designer, who said the explosion of users on the internet has brought more people to play online games on phones and PCs. “People playing mobile games are also playing PC games because they are totally different experiences,” said Total Gameplay Studio chief technology officer U Myint Kyaw Thu.

http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/business/technology/12897-mobile-could-kill-cafes.html

Poor infrastructure in Myanmar is not stopping this startup from helping local restaurants

MyanmarMyanmar might be one of the hottest emerging markets in the world right now, but its startup ecosystem continues to struggle to overcome growing pains on a daily basis. A great number of these problems stem from the dire state of the country’s infrastructure. For example, power shortages are common, especially during the summer, and backup power generators are a must-have for many businesses.

https://www.techinasia.com/smartsales-myanmar-poor-infrastructure/