Southern Cross Cable telcos ‘partnered’ with spy agencies

Telcos and network providers on the main cable system connecting Australia and New Zealand to the United States provided interception capability to British and American spy agencies, according to documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. Four global telcos and network providers operating on Southern Cross – BT, Vodafone, Level 3 and Global Crossing – are listed in the leaked documents under their codenames REMEDY, GERONTIC, LITTLE and PINNAGE respectively.

http://www.itnews.com.au/News/398269,southern-cross-cable-telcos-partnered-with-spy-agencies.aspx

NSA Approves Samsung Knox Devices For Classified Information

The U.S. National Security Agency has approved Samsung Electronics’ Galaxy devices for use by government officials to hold classified information. The four devices include Galaxy S4 and S5, Galaxy Note 3 and Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition. This is on top of the NSA using the Boeing Black, a device developed by aircraft manufacturer, with a core focus on defense and security.

http://www.chinatopix.com/articles/17801/20141021/u-s-government-approves-samsung-knox-devices-nsa.htm

NSA Revelations Have Changed ICT Decision-makers’ Behaviour towards Cloud

HONG KONG and TOKYO, Mar. 31 (ANTARA/Kyodo JBN – AsiaNet) - Report Highlights Nine Major After-shocks Compelling Organisations to Think Again about How They Use Cloud Computing – Almost nine tenths of ICT decision-makers are changing their cloud  buying behaviour as a direct result of Edward Snowden’s allegations of large scale clandestine cyber-surveillance, a study published on March 31 by NTT Communications  claims.

http://www.antaranews.com/en/news/93440/nsa-revelations-have-changed-ict-decision-makers-behaviour-towards-cloud

How a Chinese Tech Firm Became the NSA’s Surveillance Nightmare

The NSA’s global spy operation may seem unstoppable, but there’s at least one target that has proven to be a formidable obstacle: the Chinese communications technology firm Huawei, whose growth could threaten the agency’s much-publicized digital spying powers.  An unfamiliar name to American consumers, Huawei produces products that are swiftly being installed in the internet backbone in many regions of the world, displacing some of the western-built equipment that the NSA knows — and presumably knows how to exploit — so well.

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2014/03/how-huawei-became-nsa-nightmare/